ARC's, LGBTQIA+, YA

Dreadnought by April Daniels

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Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of the world’s greatest superhero. Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, she was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But then her second-hand superpowers transformed her body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

It should be the happiest time of her life, but between her father’s dangerous obsession with curing her girlhood, her best friend suddenly acting like he’s entitled to date her, and the classmate who is secretly a masked vigilante, Danny’s first weeks living in a body that fits her are more difficult and complicated than she could have imagined.

She doesn’t have much time to adjust. Dreadnought’s murderer, a cyborg named Utopia, still haunts the streets of New Port City. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.

I was lucky enough to get a Netgalley Arc of April Daniels debut novel Dreadnought. Dreadnought follows Danielle Tozer. Danielle accidentally stumbles upon a superhero and villain fight and ends up gaining new powers and the body that she has always wanted.

Danielle has a lot of self-doubts that she has to contend with throughout this story for a large part of it. A large part of that is because of the way her father treats her and always has. You can see how the way Danielle thinks about herself is linked to her father pretty early. When Danielle thinks she’s stupid for something she did or isn’t good enough to be a hero. It’s because that’s the way her father treats her and what he calls her often.

Danielle has some really strong moments in this story where she stands up for herself.Really early on. She is able to stand up for herself against the legion of superheroes.When her friend starts treating her differently. Then still can’t do the same with her father. I thought it was such an interesting relationship to see play out in this. She’s really been emotionally abused by her father for years and you see how much it affects her life.

The superheroes in this story have great names. Wonder how April Daniels came up with some of them. It’s a really great assortment of characters even the ones we don’t learn much about. I do wish we had learned more about the heroes in the legion. I really liked a few of them.Magma and Doc Impossible are the best. I loved them. I want them to be my mentors, please.

Danielle has such a great hero journey in this. It follows the motions of things you see in a lot of origin story comics for heroes. Her first big time-saving people is really amazing. I was so happy for her as she was doing it. You could tell right then that she should be a hero. Not because these powers fell into her lap but because she wants to help people. It’s kind of the reasons she got her powers in the first place. She’s not a person that can walk away when someone is hurting.

She also had some great team up moments with Calamity that every hero needs to have.Patrolling and investigating. She goes one on one with someone who has powers. She consistently is learning, getting better, and saving people throughout this. All while still having that self-doubt for a large part of the story. She doesn’t allow herself to feel like she is as special as she is.

The claiming of superhero colors was such a powerful moment in the story. I recently wrote about how the claiming of one’s name can be important in a review of a different book and I felt like Danielle’s finally deciding on her superhero colors and superhero name was that moment in this story. She’s claiming who she is.

There will be a second book and I’m excited to see what challenges Danielle faces next. Also really want to see where Calamity goes after what happens at the end of the book. More people should read this book and make fanart if you can. I can’t make fanart but I want to see fanart for this book so badly. Definitely, pick it up.

 

 

 

diverse books, LGBTQIA+

Juliet Takes A Breath Review

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Juliet Milagros Palante is leaving the Bronx and headed to Portland, Oregon. She just came out to her family and isn’t sure if her mom will ever speak to her again. But Juliet has a plan, sort of, one that’s going to help her figure out this whole “Puerto Rican lesbian” thing. She’s interning with the author of her favorite book: Harlowe Brisbane, the ultimate authority on feminism, women’s bodies, and other gay-sounding stuff.

Will Juliet be able to figure out her life over the course of one magical summer? Is that even possible? Or is she running away from all the problems that seem too big to handle?

With more questions than answers, Juliet takes on Portland, Harlowe, and most importantly, herself.

This is a really good novel.I think a lot of that is because of Juliet’s voice. She’s beautifully insightful in some moments of the book. She’s nerdy and quite funny at times too.Juliet is just a great character and it’s great to see how much she develops over the course of this novel in various areas of her life.

Juliet goes on a journey throughout the four parts of this book and I didn’t really get into the story until further along her journey but all of it is wonderful. Juliet takes this internship and doesn’t really know what she wants to get out of the experience. In the end, she got a lot more than she really thought she could. She has a place to move forward from.

This book starts out with Juliet in a stressful and relatable time. She’s coming out to her family. Juliet decides to do it at a family dinner. I like how much this book dealt with family. Even with Juliet away from them for a majority of the book you could see how important family was. Just from conversations with her mom or cousin Ava over the phone. Sometimes just from Juliet contemplating the way they reacted to things or might react to something. She thinks about her family often and I liked the focus on the family bonds.

Juliet meets some amazing women of color in this book. I felt like I was learning from Maxine and Zaira through Juliet’s encounters with them in the novel. This is a novel about feminism but more importantly intersectional feminism. Juliet is able to start figuring out where she stands in the feminism she sees on tv or reads in one of her favorite books. I absolutely loved the conversations Juliet has around this.

Sometimes as Juliet struggled I just wanted to jump in the book and answer things when she had questions she wasn’t asking anyone out loud yet.It takes her a while to feel the confidence needed to do more than just contemplate the tings she didn’t understand about queer terms or why Zaira made spaces specifically for women of color. I liked seeing Juliet learn and make mistakes while learning.Her exploration into all things queer and feminism. It was really well done.

Sidenote.There is a really odd character who is only in the story for a short time and never appears again and I didn’t understand the point of his words toward Juliet and couldn’t stop thinking what was the point there or if it was needed.Juliet never really thinks of him again after that section so it didn’t feel like it mattered.

The most relatable moment in this book for me was a feeling. The feeling that Juliet has when she is in an all QPOC space for the first time. She’s freer than she has been able to in a long time.No one is going to judge her or say the wrong thing. She won’t have to deal with microaggressions or blatant racism there. She is able to make decisions about how she perceives herself.

For me, that was an impromptu caucus for queer people of color at TheMidwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, and Ally College Conference. It was a room filled with QPOC and a space for us to talk about issues we face separate from all the other events of the conference.I didn’t even know there was that many of us in the conference. It was a major moment for me. I was dealing with not being able to embrace all aspects of my identity depending on the situation I was in. I had some rough school years and I feel like that was one of the moments that got me through. It changed things for me.It gave me perspective, I really needed.You see how much Juliet’s experience changes her on the final sections of the book.She’s able to take on the world after having run away from her problems before that. It’s great storytelling.

ARC's, LGBTQIA+, Uncategorized, YA

Of Fire and Stars Review

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Betrothed since childhood to the prince of Mynaria, Princess Dennaleia has always known what her future holds. Her marriage will seal the alliance between Mynaria and her homeland, protecting her people from other hostile lands. But Denna has a secret. She possesses an Affinity for fire—a dangerous gift for the future queen of a kingdom where magic is forbidden.

Now, Denna must learn the ways of her new home while trying to hide her growing magic. To make matters worse, she must learn to ride Mynaria’s formidable warhorses—and her teacher is the person who intimidates her most, the prickly and unconventional Princess Amaranthine—called Mare—the sister of her betrothed.

When a shocking assassination leaves the kingdom reeling, Mare and Denna reluctantly join forces to search for the culprit. As the two become closer, Mare is surprised by Denna’s intelligence and bravery, while Denna is drawn to Mare’s independent streak. And soon their friendship is threatening to blossom into something more.

I read it all in one night. This story gets to the action really fast which surprised me.Denna is sent off to a Kingdom to meet the man she’s been arranged to marry since she was born. This new kingdom is currently in a struggle with people who have magic. It’s preparing to persecute magic users. Denna has magic herself and must hide it from her future husband and his family. Then there is a magical murder Denna wants to solve along with the sister of the prince she is supposed to marry.

I have to say I loved Mare and Denna’s friendship and how it developed into real feelings. Denna and Mare are electric together on the page.

The mystery of who the killer is is and what is really going on with the magic is great too. Loved Denna’s slow acceptance of herself as a person with magic. It was beautifully written. It’s something that makes up who she is. Something she doesn’t want to reject but has to. So many parallels there for so many things.

There is a death in this book that surprisingly affected me. I was still thinking about it well after I finished the book.Still am right now. There is a type of side character I see killed off too often recently so that may be why. Won’t say much more because it would be a spoiler but it was a bit of a brutal way to die.

The magic in this book really jumps up toward the end. That makes sense because Denna really has to hide what she can do throughout. I just wish there was a bit more magic than we got actually. I love magic in books.

As a person who loves some of Tamora Pierce’s fantasy worlds I really gotta say this reminded me of them but way more queer. I was very happy with this book. Highly recommended. Excited to see where it goes from here and definitely hope the next book has more magic in it.

Book Reviews

The Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer

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Rock star, crowdfunding pioneer, and TED speaker Amanda Palmer knows all about asking. Performing as a living statue in a wedding dress, she wordlessly asked thousands of passersby for their dollars. When she became a singer, songwriter, and musician, she was not afraid to ask her audience to support her as she surfed the crowd (and slept on their couches while touring). And when she left her record label to strike out on her own, she asked her fans to support her in making an album, leading to the world’s most successful music Kickstarter.

Even while Amanda is both celebrated and attacked for her fearlessness in asking for help, she finds that there are important things she cannot ask for-as a musician, as a friend, and as a wife. She learns that she isn’t alone in this, that so many people are afraid to ask for help, and it paralyzes their lives and relationships. In this groundbreaking book, she explores these barriers in her own life and in the lives of those around her, and discovers the emotional, philosophical, and practical aspects of THE ART OF ASKING.

Part manifesto, part revelation, this is the story of an artist struggling with the new rules of exchange in the twenty-first century, both on and off the Internet. THE ART OF ASKING will inspire readers to rethink their own ideas about asking, giving, art, and love.

I did not expect this book to make me cry. It did. it happened more than once. I really felt like Amanda Palmer let us into her life with this book. I cried. I laughed.Amanda Palmer has always had a great relationship with her fans and I feel like this book continued that.Amanda treats her fans like they are her friends and this felt like she was having an intimate conversation with all her friends about her life. About the choices she’s made and how she got where she is now. The stories she tells in this are so interesting to me. I was so pulled into every single one.

The stories she tells in this are so interesting to me.The writing was wonderful as well. I was so pulled into every single one. The entire message about asking for things that we need. Being able to take help when it’s offered. It was really beautiful and necessary for a lot of people. Including me. If you haven’t seen Amanda’s TED Talk then you should go watch it. Then pick up this book.

I feel like I’ve been lucky to find amazing memoirs like this in the last year. I wasn’t a memoir fan before then at all. This was utterly amazing. I highly recommend it.

ARC's, Book Reviews, LGBTQIA+

Looking For Group by Alexis Hall

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A guy falls for a girl while playing an online MMO. The girl turns out to be a guy. The guy is mostly okay with that. After having a mini sexuality crisis moment. The guy starts the new relationship. He messes up a lot in the new relationship.He might tick you off. Eventually, things get fixed and it’s all cute and stuff, though. Yay!

That’s a simple reaction to this. Let’s go into a little more detail. There are things I loved about this and problems I can’t really get over too. At the same time, I still recommend this to people.

I loved how geeky this story was. The main character Drew is going to school for video game design. His conversations with his friends about gaming and so many other geeky things were fantastic for me. I was geeking out.

The relationship development was pretty good in my opinion. I thought the two were great together before they met at least. Drew starts to love the game again because of Kit and I liked seeing that happen. I liked how they interacted in the game and how I could see the parallel when they were together IRL. they were just really cute together. Top ten couples of the year material.

I like the in game portions of this a lot. I liked seeing them go on raids in the game. The description of the combat and the lore in the game. The issues with the world building in the game. I liked that the author thought to bring these elements into the storyIt was all pretty great.

Drew’s friends are great and annoying. His best friends comments throughout the book just annoyed me. It really made me wonder how they became friends of stay friends. Sanee just kept getting worse as the book went on. Not knowing how to react when he met Drew’s boyfriend was one of those moments.

Luckily we had Tinuviel, Drew’s pansexual poly friend in the mix too. I loved her. She actually reminded me a little of a friend from college. When Sanee said things he shouldn’t either Sanee’s girlfriend of Tin would shut it down if they were around. Tin also helped guide Drew in his crisis moment.

I said I wondered why Sanee and Drew were friends. Then I realized Drew could be just as much of a dick as Sanee. He was such a jerk for a portion of the book. I was sitting there like you are so in the wrong right now and you don’t even understand why. Eventually, he does realize the error of his ways but it bothered me a bit too much.

I loved Kit, though. I honestly found him really relatable. Since high School, I’ve had many of friends that I met online that I was closer to than people I knew day to day. I really saw where Kit was coming from.Maybe that’s why I was so ticked at Drew when he started messing things up. This book was good. Not my favorite of the year but good.

Comics

A-Force, Vol. 1: Hypertime

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What do you do when a sentient cosmic event rampages through Japan? ASSEMBLE A-FORCE! Marvel’s newest hero, SINGULARITY, has escaped Battleworld and found her way to the Marvel Universe! But she didn’t make the journey alone. To combat the villainous ANTIMATTER, Singularity will call upon Earth’s mightiest team of Avengers. And one thing’s for sure: They are A FORCE to be reckoned with!

I loved A-Force. I’m glad I started after Battleworld. I wasn’t very interested in that world from the bit I did read on it. I like seeing this team forming in this world.

A-Force is made up of some really amazing characters. I did not expect to like She-Hulk as much as I do. She’s so brave and just. She’s wonderful.

The more of Medusa I see the more I like her. She’s appeared in Mrs. Marvel a bit as well. She’s kind of scary. Not a bad thing at all. She’s powerful and not to be messed with.

I knew nothing about Nico Minoru because I still haven’t read The Runaways yet but her abilities are so interesting to me. She’s more than just a magic user. She has limitations that make her interesting. I want to read runaways to see more about her backstory. How she found out her parent was a villain. Her decision to branch away from them. It’s interesting stuff.

I want to be best friends with Dazzler. She’s an angry rocker girl with some really badass powers. I’ve never really seen a power like it in anything. I want to read more about Dazzler.

Dr. Bell isn’t a part of the team directly but she works with Captain Marvel. She’s a badass black female scientist in space. I loved her appearances in this issue. Then, of course, Captain Marvel is basically the boss of space so she’s great.

I just loved this team so much. I loved seeing them come together in this really strange situation. Someone shows up claiming they know you and that in some other dimension you are a team. This team is different than the one Singularity knows of but it still works. They still come together. I really loved the progression of it all.

Readathon, Uncategorized

A Very Pokemon TBR #ReadThemAllThon

I’m doing the  Pokemon Indigo League #ReadThemAllThon that was created by ReadAtMidnight. Go check out their awesome blog. PokemonGo is my obsession of the month right now so this came up at a good time.There are eight challenges for the readathon that runs for three weeks I believe. Not sure if I will do all the challenges because I am really a mood reader,but I’ve picked out some books for each anyway. Started one of these books early because it was a library book and I had to return it by the  14th. So I’ve already got one done.

ReadThemAllThon-Badge01-Boulder

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ReadThemAllThon-Badge02-Cascader

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ReadThemAllThon-Badge03-Thunder
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ReadThemAllThon-Badge04-Rainbow 

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This badge applies to  like every book that I read. Seriously. Look at the last three books I reviewed. If I have to pick one thing, though. I’m going with this one because it’s queer and nerdy. Also, the other books that fit here fit other places better.
ReadThemAllThon-Badge05-Soul
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ReadThemAllThon-Badge06-Marsh

30518773Recieved this from Netgalley. So excited to read it. Haven’t hit my dragon quota for the year yet.
ReadThemAllThon-Badge07-Flame

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ReadThemAllThon-Badge08-Earth 

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Not sure if this book is post-apocalyptic. It is a dystopia. I’ve wanted to read it for a while.

Super excited to take part in this event. If you are participating to then let me know in the comments down below. Will have a wrap-up video for this on my channel ChrisVIgilante when this finishes up. Hopefully, I can get to most of the books.

Book Reviews

Not Otherwise Specified by Hannah Moskowitz

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Etta is tired of dealing with all of the labels and categories that seem so important to everyone else in her small Nebraska hometown.

Everywhere she turns, someone feels she’s too fringe for the fringe. Not gay enough for the Dykes, her ex-clique, thanks to a recent relationship with a boy; not tiny and white enough for ballet, her first passion; and not sick enough to look anorexic (partially thanks to recovery). Etta doesn’t fit anywhere— until she meets Bianca, the straight, white, Christian, and seriously sick girl in Etta’s therapy group. Both girls are auditioning for Brentwood, a prestigious New York theater academy that is so not Nebraska. Bianca seems like Etta’s salvation, but how can Etta be saved by a girl who needs saving herself?

The latest powerful, original novel from Hannah Moskowitz is the story about living in and outside communities and stereotypes, and defining your own identity.

I really related to Etta on many levels. Definitely, that feeling of not enough this to fit here. Being in a community and out of it at the same time. It’s a rough place to be in. I really loved reading this story of Etta figuring out who she is, where she fits in, and really where she wants to fit in. It’s a long journey for her. Being able to move away from the people in your life that aren’t good for you and toward the people who will be.

I absolutely loved reading a book with a well-written bisexual main character.The biphobia she experiences in this book was so realistic. I’ve seen comments and attitudes like what you see in this book from people in the queer communities before. It’s so frustrating watching Etta go through it in the book and how she’s really used to it. She’s not even as angry about it as she could be.

Plus Etta is black. That’s awesome for me. I definitely need more QPOC in the books I read as a QPOC myself. I thought the class issues brought in were interesting. Etta and her family have more money than some other people. She can afford the really nice private school and all that.unlike James and Bianca.

I related to James a lot too in this. At one point in the book, I realized I was really invested in multiple characters and thought the book was going to leave me completely shattered. If it didn’t end well, for Etta, James, and Bianca I did not think I would handle it well. I came out of the book okay, though. I got emotional. I was invested when bad things happened,but overall I’m okay.

I also used to dance and totally understood Etta’s not feeling she fit in that world.Especially in ballet. I feel like things are changing there,but I don’t know how much and how fast. Then there’s the depiction of Etta’s  eating disorder and Bianca’s. It was done so well.I have/had an eating disorder and didn’t feel triggered by this like I have other books. I’m further along than I was a few years back ,but I honestly think this was because of how great Hannah Moskowitz. I still feel liked I’d be triggered by one YA book, in particular, dealing with eating disorders that I won’t name if I read it now. This one just worked.

I really appreciate what Moskowitz has done with this book. What she has told us with the story and these great characters. I definitely will look into more books by this author after having enjoyed this book so much.